If you’ve ever spent time in PV, you’ve likely asked yourself what it must be like to live here

I recently moved here 6 months ago and have a lot of ‘curious’ friends back home wondering what it’s like to live in a foreign country.  For many of those friends, I’m the only person they’ve known to up and move long before retirement.

But I’m not alone down here.  Nope.  Not by a long shot.

I’m one of 35,000 Americans living in PV.  It’s not just retirees moving here, it’s 30 somethings.  They come here working remotely, making art, performing music, teaching.  We pump money into the local economy, renovate historical homes and change the classroom.

Affordability is a strong reason why many choose Mexico.  The weather here in PV is about as perfect as it gets and it’s safe.  There are most certainly things you’ll miss about the US – it will take you astronomically longer to open a bank account down here, when you meet a contractor (or anyone) for work you may find yourself waiting 45 minutes beyond the appointment, many times it will be difficult to find something you need at the store and then when you go back to buy it the next time it isn’t there.  Ever.

So I mention this because if you get to have the good parts you also have to take the not-so-good parts.

What do you LOVE about living here in PV?

Health care is way less expensive down here, costing around $1000 per person per YEAR.  And not much is excluded from that policy, in fact most is covered 100%.  A teeth cleaning at the dentist will set you back about $25.  It costs ‘Fluffy’ about $12 for his ‘Fluff ‘n Buff’ treatment at the dog groomer.  Fluffy eats for about $1 per day and that includes his heart worm & flea protection.

I spend an average of $50 a week on groceries.  A taco lunch on the street costs less than $2.  Add a beer for another $1.

Besides being a great financial decision, the sun is out every day. I go for walks. I enjoy a meal with my new Mexican friends. I teach them English slang and they teach me the basics of Spanish. We pass the time together.

There is a quality of life here that I just didn’t get in the states. It’s slower, like it used to be before cell phones and the internet. No one cares so much about ‘stuff’. No one has a nice car. No one walks around with the latest designer hand bag. No one wears expensive jewelry.

I am thankful for a simple meal and clean clothes. Might sound a little too simple for some but it’s given me a sense of freedom to let all that go and just be happy with this fortunate experience I’ve been given a chance to live.

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