On Monday, September 16, Mexicans will celebrate the anniversary of the country’s independence from Spain in 1810.

The date marks the moment when Miguel Hidalgo, a charismatic but disastrous priest, gets the ball rolling with his cry for independence, known as the Cry for Delores. It is read by the mayor at 11pm from the balcony at city hall. Fireworks to follow.

So this day actually marks the beginning of the struggle. Independence did not come until 1821, 11 years later. Hidalgo was beheaded as punishment for revolting. There were numerous leaders of the movement, many of them executed as well.

This mainland of New Spain was organized as the Mexican Empire and later changed to a federal republic in 1823 when Mexico separated from Central America.

In case you were thinking that Mexico gained their independence on Cinco De Mayo, that is not the case. Cinco De Mayo came 41 years after Mexico gained its independence, in a battle in Puebla that defeated the French Army. It is a celebrated holiday in the town of Puebla but mostly gets its popularity from corporate America promoting beer, tequila and tacos.

Over 100 traditionally costumed riders in embroidered jackets ride their immaculately groomed horses in a parade, followed by a performance on the Malecón. The parade will follow a traditional path that starts at Parque Hidalgo, through the boardwalk Malecón and finish in the Main Square.

Don’t miss Dia Del Charro on September 14!  This day recognizes Mexican culture and honor the charros, Mexican gentlemen cowboys.  More parades and festivities.

Share This